Washington County

Bridge Map

Each year Washington and Greene Counties hold their Annual Covered Bridge Festival. Each of the ten festival locations offers a charming atmosphere and an array of activities, including hand-made arts & crafts, home-style foods, historical re-enactments, crafting demonstrations and delightful entertainment. Held the third weekend in September each year, this Covered Bridge Festival is widely regarded as a signature event in the area, and a great way to enjoy the beginning of the autumn season.

The admission price is free. You can visit all of the remaining covered bridges in the counties during these days. There are 29 covered bridges still standing in Washington and Greene counties. Pennsylvania has 197 covered bridges still standing statewide. Some you are unable to drive through, but there many you can still drive through.



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Bailey Covered Bridge

Photo Album

GPS N40 01.24 W80 11.74)
 (# 38-63-08)

The Bailey Bridge is covered with vertical board siding on both the sides and portals, and is painted barn red inside and out.  The Bailey has a sheet metal roof and a deck with crosswise planking.  Also, two rectangular windows pierce each of the sidewalls in addition to the typical narrow lengthwise openings under the eaves.  The cut stone abutments and span of the deck are now supported by steel "I" beams that rest on concrete abutments, poured over the original stone and mortar abutments, and a mid stream concrete pier.  The bridge also has stone and mortar wing walls.

Located over Ten Mile Creek, The Bailey Bridge is the last Burr Truss covered bridge still standing in Washington County. The Burr Truss is an arch truss that combines great wooden arches with multiple Kingpost trusses.  The arches tie directly into the bridge's abutment, allowing the wider streams and rivers to be spanned.

It is said that the Bailey brothers, who owned the property the bridge is located on, contracted Daniel Smith to build the bridge in 1889.

An interesting and somewhat disturbing incident occurred at the Bailey on July 23 1994.  Someone drove a truck into the middle of the bridge and set the truck on fire.  It was rebuilt using all new materials except for the Burr arches and central cross timber of each truss. The Bailey was fully restored in 1999.

The Bailey was built in 1889 by the Bailey Brothers utilizing the Burr Truss. The length of the structure is 66 feet long and 15 feet wide. The Bailey crosses Ten Mile Creek in Amwell Township. The bridge is owned by the County and opened to vehicular traffic.

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Brownlee / Scott Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N40 06.577 W80 25.374)
(#38-63-09)

Brownlee/Scott Bridge is located In McGuffey Community Park SW of Claysville, Donegal Township.  the bridge was moved from across Templeton Fork Wheeling Creek NNW of East Finley, East Finley Township. The structure was removed by the county & moved to Claysville and restored 2008. The year and builder of the original bridge is unknown. The structure is 31 feet long and 11 feet wide and utilizes Kingpost truss.  The bridge crosses a dry creek bed in the park. The bridge is owned and maintained by the county. The condition of the bridge is excellent and allows vehicle traffic.

This bridge is covered with vertical board on both the sides and portals, it s painted barn red inside and outside, has a sheet metal roof.  There are two rectangular windows in each side in addition to the lengthwise openings under the eaves. The entire structure is supported with additional wooden timbers that are positioned at equal thirds resting in the streambed. It rests on cut stone and mortar abutments built on concrete foundations; the abutments extend to form stone and mortar wing walls.

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Crawford Covered Bridge

Photo Album

GPS N39 59.93 W80 28.36)
(#38-63-10)

The Crawford Covered  Bridge is located on Township Route 307, just west of State Route 3037, approximately 0.7 miles northwest of W. Finley, in W. Finley Township, Pennsylvania. The year and the builder of the structure is unknown. The Queenpost truss was used in construction of the bridge, it is 39 feet long and 11 feet wide. The bridge crosses Robinson Fork, Wheeling Creek. The bridge is owned and maintained by Washington County, Pennsylvania it is in good condition and open to vehicular traffic.

The bridge has high sidewalls and portals both of vertical board siding, a sheet metal roof, a deck of crosswise planking and is painted barn red inside and out. The Crawford has two rectangular side windows on each side, in addition to the eave openings. It sits on cut stone and mortar abutments laid on the concrete foundations, and its abutments extend to form short stone and mortar wing walls. The Crawford is also reinforced with heavy timbers that are positioned in the streambed at equal intervals under the cross members of the deck. Very little is known of the origins of the Crawford Bridge. It was closed for six months in 1996 for restoration.

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Danley Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N40 03.32 W80 26.36)
(#38-63-11)

The Location of the Danley is on Township Route 379, just east of State Route 3025, approximately 1.2 miles north of Good Intent, in West Finley Township. The year and builder of the structure is unknown. The Queenpost truss was utilized in the construction of the bridge. The length is 39 feet and the width is 11 feet 7 inches. Washington County own and maintains the structure and landscape around the bridge. The Danley crosses Robinson Fork, Wheeling Creek and is open to vehicles.

The Danley is located along a gravel township road in a hidden valley of Washington County. Similar to the Day Bridge, the Danley is covered with vertical plank siding on both the sides and portals, and has a sheet metal gable roof. It also has a plain box like appearance that is painted barn red inside and out.  The bridge also has a deck of crosswise planking, and two rectangular window on each side, as well as the typical eave openings. The Danley Bridge rests on stone and mortar abutments with stone and mortar wing walls on one end and concrete wing walls on the other side. The deck is also supported with two sets of wooden timbers that rest in the streambed. It is thought that this bridge, and others like it, were the handiwork of local carpenters. The timbers in the Queenpost Truss construction of the bridge are all sawed which indicates the date of the bridge's construction is post-1860. Records indicate it was closed temporarily between 1996 and 2000 for restoration.

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Day Covered Bridge

Photo Album

 (GPS N40 01.76 W80 17.56)
 (#38-63-12)

Day Bridge is located on Township Route 339, just south of State Route 18, approximately 1.4 miles east of Sparta, in Morris Township. The Bridge was built utilizing the Queenpost Truss.  The structure is 36 feet 6 inches in length and the width is 12 feet, it crosses Short Creek. The builder of the bridge is unknown, it is owned and maintained by the county, it is in good condition and open to vehicle traffic.

This is another typical Washington County covered bridge, the Day is covered with vertical plank siding on both the sides and portals, and has a sheet metal gable roof, it also has a plain, box like appearance that is painted barn red inside and out.  The bridge also has a deck of crosswise planking and two rectangular windows on each side, as well as the typical eave openings. This bridge of Queenpost truss design rests on the stone and mortar abutments reinforced with concrete and one abutment that appears to be all concrete. It has wingwall on both ends, three of which are stone and mortar and the fourth concrete

Noteworthy, the Day Bridge was closed between 1999 and 2003 when inspectors found it so deteriorated that it could not support three tons a state requirement for bridges. While a temporary bypass was utilized, renovation began in December, 2002, involving the installation of steel support beams, a new roof, flooring, and sidewalls. The Day Bridge reopened in June, 2003.

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Devil's Den / McClurg Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N40 25.28 W80 26.80)
 (#38-63-13)

This bridge is located in Hanover Township Park, on the south side of State Route 4004, approximately 1 mile west of Florence, in Hanover Township. The park gate is not always open, but access can usually be obtained by stopping in the township office across the road form the park entrance.

The structure utilizes the Kingpost Truss and is 24 feet long and the width is 12 feet 3 inches, it crosses a small ravine. The year and builder of the bridge is unknown, it is owned and maintained by the county.

The McClurg/Devil's Den Bridge is covered on its sides and portals with barn red vertical plank siding, and is pierced on each side by three rectangular windows, as well as the eave openings.  The bridge also has a roof of cedar shakes and a deck of crosswise planking. It rests on stone and mortar abutments with short stone and mortar wingwalls, and has an additional U shaped vertical timbers support under the middle of the deck that rests in the ravine.  The covered bridge has two commonly used names. It is referred to as "Devil's Den" because of the cave hidden behind the waterfall near where the bridge used to stand.  The current name, McClurg is derived from the family that owned the land around where the bridge originally stood.

In 1952, only the original weatherboard remained of this bridge's Kingpost construction. Today, it is unknown how much, if any, of the original siding remains. The County moved the bridge in 1987 form its original location over King's Creek, just north of Paris in the northwest corner of the County, to its present location over a small dry ravine in Hanover Township Park. The Bridge is only open to foot traffic.

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Ebenezer Church Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N40 11.51 W80 02.41)
 (#38-63-14)

Ebenezer Bridge is located just southeast of County Road in Mino Creek County Park, approximately 1 mile from the west entrance to the park off of State Rute 1059, about 0.5 mile north of Kammerer in Nottingham Township.

The year and the builder of this structure is unknown, a Queen Truss was utilized in the contruction, it is 32 feet long and 15 feet wide, crosses Mingo Creek. The owner is the county, it is in good condition and open to vehicle traffic

The Ebenezer Bridge is one of the most popular covered bridges in Washington County today. It was moved to Mingo Creek Park from Ginger Hill (Where it crossed the South Fork of Male Creek) in 1977, and placed on the abutments of an earlier bridge. Alterations had to be made to the structure of the bridge to incorporate it into the landscape. The revised structure resembles an old styl train caboose, when approaching the bridge from the side. Otherwise, it is very similar in style to the County's other covered bridges.

The Ebenezer is covered with vertical board siding on the sides and portals, is painted barn red both inside and out, has a sheet metal roof and a deck of crosswise planking, and has two rectangular windows on each side, with fairly wide eave, openings. The deck is heavily reinforced with five steel "I" beams which, in turn, rest on the original abutments reinforced with concrete. The bridge also has long cut stone and mortar wingwalls that are capped off with concrete.

Part of the reason for the popularity of the Ebenezer is its location in Mingo Creek County Park and its participation in the yearly Covered Bridge Festival.

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Erskine Covered Bridge

Photo Album

GPS N40 03.99 W80 30.98)
 (#38-63-15)

The Erskine Bridge was built by William Gordon in 1845 utilizing the Queenpost design. The structure is 39 feet 6 inches long and 11 feet 8 inches wide. The Erskine crosses Middle Wheeling Creek, it is owned and maintained by the county and open to vehicle traffic.

The Erskine Bridge is the oldest bridge remaining in Washington County, and has the typical vertical plank siding on the sides and portals, a tin covered gable roof, and a plain box like appearance. Painted barn red both inside and out, it has a deck of crosswise planking, and two windows on each side with narrow eave openings. The structure rests on stone and mortar abutments reinforced with concrete and heavy timbers resting in a streambed.  It also has short concrete wingwalls on the north end attractive, short stone and mortar wingwalls on the south end. The Erskine sits one tenth of a mile from the border of W. Virginia, making it the farthest west of any bridge in the State of Pennsylvania.

Its name comes from t he Erskine family, who owned the land surrounding the bridge. Robert Erskine died in 1872 leaving his family stuck in debt. To help pay off the debt, the family leased a large part of the land to a mining company for a period of years during the 1880's. The erskine survived both the strip mining and the floods of 1888. The bridge was reconstructed in 2006. 

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Henry Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N40 12.15 W80 00.98)
 (#38-63-16)

Henry Covered bridge was built in 1841 the builder is unknown, they used the Queenpost design in its construction. The bridge is 36 feet long and 12 feet 6 inches wide, it crosses Mingo Creek. The structure is owned and maintained by the Washington County and open to vehicular traffic.

Although the Henry Bridge is popular among residents, its actual origin is not known. It has vertical board siding on both the side and portals, is painted barn red inside and out, and has a tin covered gable roof. Two square windows, as well as narrow eave openings, are located on the sidewalls. It also has a deck of crosswise planking and moderated length stone and mortar wingwalls capped with concrete. The cut stone abutments of this Queenpost truss bridge are braced by concrete supports.

The Henry's location is in Mingo Creek Park, Washington County, Pennsylvania and its participation in the annual Covered Bridge Festival, make it a local favorite. Because of its location within the park, it is heavily traveled bridge. Consequently the deck of the bridge has been reinforced with five steel "I" beams that rest on the concrete abutments.

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Hughes Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N40 01.37 W80 10.36)
 (#38-63-17)

The Hughes was built in 1889 and the builder is unknown, the Queenpost was used in the construction. The bridge is 55 feet 6 inches long and 12 feet 4 inches wide., it crosses Ten Mile Creek. The Township owns and maintains the landscape around the structure, it is only open to foot traffic.

The history of the Hughes covered Bridge is long and well documented. In 1889 Amwell Township built the Queenpost truss bridge. However, the combination of hewed and sawed timbers in the truss system suggests that this bridge replaced an earlier bridge in the same location. Another possibility is that materials from a bridge that had washed away, which originally stood close by, were used in the construction of the Hughes Bridge.

In support of these possible theories is the date of the bridge, 1889, immediately following the floods of 1888. In evidence of this, there is a map dated 1878 in Rural Reflections of Amwell Township, Volume 1, that shows a bridge located on t he property of Esq'r Hughes and sons in the vicinity of two saw mills. This confirms the possibility that, before the floods of 1888, a bridge stood in this general area.

In 1915, Washington County took over the maintenance of the bridge. The County expressed a desire in 1971 to move the bridge to Mingo Creek Park and began demolishing the bridge. Amwell Township expressed what they considered their rights to ownership of the bridge and filed suit against Washington County on January 26, 1971, to stop the County from moving the bridge. in court, the County maintained that in 1915 when it took over the maintenance of the bridge, it also acquired ownership of the Hughes. On January 30, 1971, a judge ruled in favor of Amwell Township and ordered Washington County to restore the bridge to the condition it was in previous to the demolition process.

(Note: It would have been much better if the county would have won that court case, after photographing the bridges in Mingo Park, that have been relocated, and the Hughes ,it is not hard see there is no comparison in the upkeep and maintenance, Mingo Park by far are the best.)

Today, the Hughes is used only for foot traffic, and stands in its original park like location in a field off of Interstate 79 at the Marianna Exit, south of Washington. It has vertical board siding on both the portals and sides; it painted barn red both inside and out; has four rectangular windows on each side together with narrow eave openings and a tin covered gable roof. There is no additional steel or wood reinforcement and the bridge rests on a concrete abutment at the north end, and a cut stone and mortar abutment at the south end,. It has short, cut stone and mortar wingwalls, capped with concrete at both ends.

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Jackson's Mill Covered Bridge

Photo Album

 (GPS N40 25.44 W80 29.35)
 (#38-63-18)

The year and builder of the Jackson's Mills Bridge is unknown, it was built using the Queenpost design. The bridge crosses Kings Creek and is open to vehicular traffic. The County owns and maintains the structure, it is 35 feet long and 14 feet wide.

Jackson's Mill Bridge has outlived any record of its construction. There is record that petition was filed in 1865 for a bridge to be built at this site. However in many counties bridge records were not kept therefore, it is possible that this is a later bridge. The bride is rumored to have been named after William Jackson who owned a Grist Mill near the bridge site in the 1870's and 180's. Located in a remote county valley, its design is consistent with various area covered bridges. It is covered with vertical board siding on both the sides and portals, painted barn red both inside and out, except for the replaced boards, which are unpainted. The roof is sheet metal, the deck has crosswise planking, and the sides have two windows located at the ends in addition to the eave openings. The deck is reinforced with wooden, trestle type supports, which rest in the streamed. It sits on cut stone and mortar abutments laid up on concrete footings that are extended to from stone and mortar wingwalls. One of the wingwalls has been replaced with concrete.

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Krepp's Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N40 20.43 W80 19.88)
 (#38-63-19)

The Krepp's was built utilizing the Kingpost design, both the builder and the year it was built is unknown. The bridge crosses Cherry Creek and is 24 feet long and 13 feet 3 inches wide, it is owned and maintained by Washington County and open to vehicular traffic.

The Krepp's Bridge is yet another Washington County Covered Bridge that has outlived any record of its construction. The Kingpost design of the Krepp's Bridge has been braced with wooden supports.

It has vertical board siding on both the portals and sides, is pointed barn red inside and out, has a sheet metal roof, a deck of crosswise planking, and two rectangular windows on each side in addition to the eave openings. The entire structure is reinforced with treated timber supports that sit in the streambed

Otherwise, the structure rests on a concrete abutment at the west end of a stone and mortar abutment at the east end. The stone and mortar abutment has been extended to form moderate length wingwalls that capped with concrete. The bridge was moved a short distance, sometime between 1952 and 1958, to allow for the creation of a concrete structure that now stands in the original location of the bridge.

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Leatherman Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N40 07.21 W80 05.49)
 (#38- 63-20)

The Leatherman Bridge was built utilizing the Queenpost design, neither the year or the builder is known. The bridge is 36 feet long and 12 feet wide and crosses the South Branch, Pigeon Creek. Leatherman Bridge is owned and maintained by the county and is open to vehicular traffic.

The Leatherman Bridge is typical of most of the Washington County bridges, it has vertical board siding on both sides and portals, is painted barn red both inside and outside, sheet metal roof, a deck of crosswise planking, and two windows on each side in addition to the narrow eave openings. The deck is supported by framework of heavy timbers resting in the center of the streambed, and the entire structure rests on a concrete abutment at one end and a combination of stone, mortar, and concrete ate the other end. There are also moderate length stone and mortar wingwalls capped with concrete. Although the year of the Leatherman's construction is unknown, it can be inferred that the bridge was built after 1860 because all of the timbers of the Queenpost construction are sawed.  It is also unclear who the bridge was named after. Local lore indicated that it was named after Joseph Letherman on of the area's earliest doctors, who lived in the vicinity for a brief period of time. Note that the road name is not spelled the same as the bridge name.

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Longdon L. Miller Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N39 58.70 W80 26.75)
 (#38-63-22)

This bridge utilizes the Queenpost design, the builder and year of construction is unknown. The Longdon is 67 feet long 7 inches long and 11 feet 10 inches wide, it crosses Templeton Fork, Wheeling Creek. The structure is owned and maintained by the county and open to vehicular traffic.

This is another bridge that is well secluded along a gravel township road.  It is rather long Queenpost truss structure that has four wooden trestle supports under its sixty seven foot long deck.  All of the barn red vertical board siding is in good shape on the sides and the portals being it was refurbished in 2001. It has a sheet metal roof and deck of crosswise planking and there are three rectangular windows on each side, one at each end and one in the center. in addition to the narrow eave openings.  It rests on cut stone and mortar abutments that have been extended to form short stone and mortar wingwalls, one of which is capped with concrete.

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Lyle Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N40 27.25 W80 22.51)
 (#38-63-21)

This Washington County bridge is tucked away in a remote, quiet valley along a gravel township road.  The bridge  is the shortest covered bridge in the County, although the year of the bridge's construction is unknown, there is an inspection record which traced the maintenance of the Lyle from 1915 until sometime in the mid 1930's. According to this record, the county made repairs to this bridge of Washington County design, with its vertical plank siding and tin covered gable roof in 1920. This bridge also has a deck of crosswise planking, three windows on each side. in addition to the fairly wide eave openings. The entire structure rests on stone and mortar abutments, which have been extended to from short wingwalls. The deck of the bridge appears to be sagging and is supported with two heavy timber trestles that are placed equidistant from each end. Some of the barn red vertical board siding is missing on the sides and portals.

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Mays Blaney Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N40 05.31 W80 29.23)
 (#38-63-23)

The Mays Blaney was built in 1882 the builder is unknown, it utilizes the Queenpost design and crosses Middle Wheeling Creek. The bridge is 31 feet 6 inches long and 11 feet 10 inches wide. The structure is owned and maintained by the county and open to vehicle traffic.

This bridge has outlived the record of its origins, with the exception of the date of construction in 1882. It is located along a remote gravel township road in a quiet secluded valley.  like many other Washington County bridges, the May Blaney is painted barn red inside and out and has vertical plank siding on both the sides and portals, a tin covered gable roof, and a deck of crosswise vertical planking. It also has two windows on each side, together with narrow openings under the eaves. The May Blaney rests on stone and mortar abutments that extend into wingwalls.

It has additional timber trestles that rest in the streambed and support the deck.  The bridge is believed to be named for J. Blaney, who at one time owned land to the east of the bridge

It is interesting to not that, as late as 1952, much of the bridge's original pine siding remained fully intact, even after repairs were made to the bridge in early 1900's. This bridge has been refurbished in 2006.

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Pine Bank Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N40 17.25 W80 29.53)
 (#38-63-
35)

Pine Bank was built in 1870 using the Kingpost design, its builder is unknown. The bridge is 30 feet 6 inches long and 15 feet wide, it crosses Avella Ravine in Meadowcroft Village property. The owner of the bridge is private. The bridge is located in Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Museum of Rural Life, just North of State Rte. 4018 in Avella. Please note: Meadowcroft operating hours are Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day weekend, Wednesday-Saturday 12 pm-5pm; Sunday 1 pm-5pm. Other appointments can be made by calling 724-587-3412.

Although built in 1870, this bridge is unique to the area because of its later arrival on Washington County's soil in 1962.  With vertical plank siding and gable roof, this bridge was originally located in Greene County over Toms Run in Gilmore Township.  In 1962, Albert Miller moved the bridge into Meadowcroft Village, a 19th century town recreated as a tourist attraction, with many buildings original to the period.  This is the only covered bridge that is not original to Washington County. Although similar in color to the other bridges. it differs in style in both its roof and portal design.  The interior walls remain unpainted, revealing several old advertisements.  Resting on stone abutments that have been laid dry, it has large, cut stone slabs at each end where typically the wingwalls would be.

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Plants Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N40 01.27 W80 24.95)
 (#38-63-26)

The Plants Bridge was constructed using the Kingpost design, neither the year of construction or the builder is known. It is owned and maintained by the county and opened to vehicular traffic. The bridge is 24 feet 6 inches long and 12 feet 19 inches wide, it crosses Templeton Fork, Wheeling Creek.

Plant's Bridge is a rather short Kingpost truss structure with its vertical plank siding and tin covered gable roof, the Plants Bridge typifies the style of other bridges in Washington County.  Painted barn red inside and out.  It has a deck of crosswise planking and two rectangular window on each side.  The only reinforcements under the deck are the stone and mortar abutments that extend into short wingwalls.  It is supported entirely by the Kingpost truss system.  Although the exact year of the construction is unknown, it is thought to be built by Leonard Plants sometime after 1880.  Leonard left his home to apprentice as a carpenter and shortly thereafter was hired to work on the National Road. After his father's death in 1880, Plants return home and turned the once unproductive land into a successful farm. Given Leonard's background as a carpenter, and considering the improvements he made to the farm upon his return, he is most likely the builder of the Plants Covered Bridge.

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Ralston Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N40 26.89 W80 30.33)
 (#38-63-27)

Ralston Freeman Bridge was built in 1915 utilizing the Kingpost design, its builder is unknown. The bridge is 28 feet long and 12 feet wide, it crosses Aunt Clara's, Kings Creek. The structure is privately owned and the area is posted against trespassing.

This bridge is truly located in the most remote corner of the county, at the end of a road that is in very poor condition. It is now on private property and being maintained by the owner and posted with No Trespassing signs because of the difficulty the owner has had with "parting" visitors. Otherwise, it is typical of the other county bridges, similar siding, roof, deck, abutments, and wingwalls. The owner has tried hard to maintain it in a condition equal to most of the other county covered bridges.

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Sawhill Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N40 10.81 W80 24.97)
 (#38-63-34)

Sawhill was built in 1915 by builder unknown and utilizes the Queenpost design. The bridge is 49 feet long and 12 feet 6 inches wide and crosses Buffalo Creek. The structure is owned and maintained by the county and open to vehicular traffic.

This bridge is one of the few Washington County covered bridges not hidden away in a remote area.  With vertical plank siding that is painted barn red inside and out, it presents three rectangular windows on each side.  The deck has crosswise planking and a tin covered gable roof.  The Queenpost truss structure rests on on concrete abutment and one made of stone and mortar extended to form attractive curved wingwalls on the Route 221 end of the bridge.  The deck requires no additional reinforcement. The Sawhill is the second of only two covered bridges built in Washington County during World War I, partially as a result of the shortage of steel during the war years.  The Sawhill was recently reconstructed from its foundation up, as the remnants of 2004's Hurricane Ivan had heavily damaged the bridge, causing it to lean and making it impassable.

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Sprowls Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N40 00.65 W80 24.39)
(#38-63-03)

Sprowl's Covered Bridge was built in 1875 utilizing the Kingpost design, its builder is unknown. The bridge is 36 feet long and 12 feet 7 inches wide and crosses Rocky Run, it is owned and maintained by the county and open to vehicular traffic.

The Bridge is located in a secluded rural valley on a gravel township road.  It has a tin covered gable roof, vertical siding on the walls and portals, and is painted barn red inside and out.  The bridge reveals square windows cut into the sidewalls, in addition to the narrow openings under the eaves.  The Sprowls has a deck of crosswise planking and rests on stone and mortar abutments reinforced with concrete.  It has stone and mortar wingwalls capped with concrete. This is another covered bridge whose history remains unknown.

The Bridge was temporarily closed in 2000 due to damage done by mining operations in the area.  Repairs have since been made as the truss structure was severely twisted, and wide cracks developed in the abutments.

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Wright / Cerl Covered Bridge

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GPS N40 09.54 W80 02.91)
 (#38-63-30)

Wright Covered Bridge was built using the Kingpost design, the year of construction and the builder is unknown. The bridge is 26 feet long and 13 feet 4 inches wide and crosses the North Branch, Pigeon Creek. The structure is owned and maintained by the county and open to vehicular traffic.

The Wright Bridge has a tin covered gable roof with vertical plank siding that is painted barn red inside and out.  The deck abutments, wingwalls, and timber supports resting in the stream are also typical of other Washington County covered bridges.  It is located just a few miles west of Kammerer exit off of Interstate 70.  This is the most easily visible of all the covered bridges in Washington County.  With the exception of two, all of the Kingposts in the truss system are sawed, indicating that the timbers from a previous bridge were used. While the original date of construction of the Wright is estimated between 1875 and 1899, it was restored in 1999.

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Wyit Sprowls Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N40 02.30 W80 24.18)
(#38-63-29)

Wyit Sprowls was built in 1915 and the builder is unknown, its length is 43 feet and the width is 11 feet 6 inches. The bridge utilizes the Queenpost design and crosses Robinson Fork, Wheeling Creek. The structure is owned and maintained by the county and open to vehicular traffic.

This bridge is another typical Washington County covered bridge with vertical plank siding that is painted barn red both inside and out and features a tin covered gable roof.  It has crosswise deck planking, two rectangular windows on each side, and wooden trestle supports resting in the streambed.  The major difference in this bridge is that both abutments are poured concrete and have been extended to form short concrete wingwalls.  Originally located in West Finley this bridge was named after Wyit Sprowls, who owned the surrounding land in the 1800's.  Rebuilding took approximately five years, and was rededicated in its present location on August 25, 2001.  Incidentally, the bridge was reconstructed with only two windows on each side, as opposed to the three it had initially.

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